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MEDICAL ETHICS SPECIALISTS, EXPERTS WITNESSES, IME DOCTORS and FORENSIC CONSULTANTS.



Medical ethics is the discipline of evaluating the merits, risks, and social concerns of activities in the field of medicine.

Medical ethics shares many principles with other branches of healthcare ethics, such as nursing ethics.

Ethical thinkers have suggested many methods to help evaluate the ethics of a situation. These methods provide principles that doctors should consider while decision making.


Chairman Expert Witnesses:

Medford, NY, US

PRC Professional Records Consulting

Over 30 years of continuous clinical practice as R.N. Diverse practice includes: Intravenous Infusion, Home Care, Clinical Research Protocols,Adjunct Staff University and Medical Surgical Nursing. Standards of Care, Medical Records Review



Executive Expert Witnesses:

Seattle, WA, US

Pacific Neuropsychiatric Institute

Vernon M Neppe  MD, PhD.  Fellow Royal Society (SAf): Internationally respected, experienced, published neuropsychiatrist, behavioral neurologist, psychopharmacologist, psychiatrist, epilepsy specialist, researcher, neuroscientist, neuropharmacologist and objective nationally retained  forensic specialist (civil: plaintiff / defense), author and public speaker.




More Details:

Medical ethics is the discipline of evaluating the merits, risks, and social concerns of activities in the field of medicine.

Medical ethics shares many principles with other branches of healthcare ethics, such as nursing ethics.

Ethical thinkers have suggested many methods to help evaluate the ethics of a situation. These methods provide principles that doctors should consider while decision making.

Six of the principles commonly included are:

Beneficence - a practitioner should act in the best interest of the patient. (Salus aegroti suprema lex.)

Non-maleficence - "first, do no harm" (primum non nocere). Autonomy - the patient has the right to refuse or choose their treatment. (Voluntas aegroti suprema lex.)

Justice - concerns the distribution of scarce health resources, and the decision of who gets what treatment.

Dignity - the patient (and the person treating the patient) have the right to dignity.

Truthfulness and honesty - the patient should not be lied to, and deserves to know the whole truth about their illness and treatment (though certain exceptions are made for the proper use of placebos).